All posts by IRIS Lab

Your Guide To Safe Asbestos Removal

Removing asbestos from your office building or facility is crucial to the prevention of asbestos exposure. Asbestos refers to a group of six naturally occurring minerals that are recognized by their microscopic, needle-like fibers that can easily get lodged in our lungs. Before the harmful effects of asbestos were discovered, asbestos was widely used in industries like construction because of their heat resistant and insulating properties. This is why it is common to find asbestos-containing materials in old buildings. However, it was found that these fibers are actually associated with various forms of cancer, such as mesothelioma, and asbestosis, which is the scarring of the lungs.

Asbestos becomes dangerous when these materials are being disturbed. This can occur during renovation efforts or demolition projects. The microscopic fibers can become airborne and enter our respiratory systems. Understanding the processes that go into the abatement of asbestos is extremely important.

Asbestos Inspection

If you are working in an old building or if you own an old property, you do not have to panic. This is because asbestos is relatively safe if it remains undisturbed. However, before you embark on any renovation project, you might want to consider hiring a professional asbestos tester to help you conduct an asbestos inspection. They will be able to carry out a visual inspection as well as take samples to send back to the laboratory for testing. In the unfortunate case where they find asbestos in your home, they will be able to hand you a detailed evaluation that tells you where the asbestos can be found in your home and the quantity of it. Furthermore, your asbestos inspector should be able to advise you on how to fix the situation or to prevent disturbing the asbestos.

Finding Asbestos Abatement Professionals

In accordance to the strict regulations, federal and state laws, the removal of asbestos has to be done a certain way. A good way to find a good asbestos abatement professional is to find someone that is certified by the EPA. What this means is that they have gone through the necessary training and the certification exam. They are also required to undergo refresher courses every year to make sure that they up to par.

Understanding the Abatement Process

The moment you have decided on the company that you want, it would only beneficial if you had a deeper understanding of the processes that go into asbestos abatement. This can help you to judge whether all the actions are in line with the state regulations as well. Before you decide to start the work, you should examine the contract that informs you of the professional’s detailed plan. This includes the guidelines that they have to abide by and the methods of removal of asbestos-containing materials.

You also have to ensure that there is good demarcation of the areas that the professionals want to inspect. The worksite needs to be marked out so that no living thing enters and risks getting exposed to asbestos. In order to prevent the fibers from travelling to other areas in the facility, air conditioning should be shut off as well. Note that asbestos-containing material should never be broken into smaller parts because this can make the fibers airborne. More importantly, the worksite should always be up to standard and clean. It should be cleaned with proper rags and vacuums so that asbestos does not spread.

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When Should You Conduct A Mold Inspection?

A mold inspection isn’t something that’s only applicable when you’re buying a home. If you’re starting a business or transferring your existing business to a new location, you will want to check that location for a number of things – mold included. Depending on the size of the building, the price of an inspection can vary. But is it absolutely necessary to have a mold inspection done? Is it worth the cost?

A mold inspection can be necessary for any number of reasons. We are going to explore those below and then tell you whom to turn to should you decide that you’d like to get a mold inspection done on your commercial property.

First things first – let’s take a look, specifically, at mold.

Mold/Fungus

Like all fungi, because it is a fungus, mold thrives in places that are moist. Single-celled, microscopic particles are emitted by mold. These are referred to as spores. That’s how it spreads. Until they land on a surface, they simply float around in the air. Both inside and outside, mold spores are everywhere. Without installing some big filtration system on an industrial level with which to clean the air in a room, it’s virtually impossible to get all mold spores removed from the atmosphere in a building.

Only if they land on a damp surface, however, can mold actually be formed by mold spores. The dryer you keep the inside of a facility, the less chance you have that mold will become a problem. By making sure that bathrooms and kitchens are properly vented (if you have full baths and kitchens in your commercial facility), repairing leaks in your HVAC, plumbing, and roof, and by cleaning up spills, you will be doing the best you can to prevent mold.

Is It That Big of a Deal?

Short answer: Yes! Mold is a big deal. There are a couple of basic reasons why your commercial facility should have mold clean up and removal if it is growing.

  • It can aggravate asthma or allergies
  • It can damage the surfaces upon which it grows

Is It Time for a Mold Inspection?

One of the best things about mold is that it is relatively easy to see. You can count on the fact that it’s growing and spreading spores if you can see mold in the corners and cracks of walls, floors, etc. However, in between your walls and in the ducts, places you can’t see, mold can also grow. In this case, it’s easy for detection to escape you.

If you notice the following, you should absolutely schedule a mold inspection:

  • If you notice white, black, blue, or green stuff growing on surfaces. Remember, it may spread to more than just the surfaces you currently see.
  • Following a mold problem. To make sure that your mold remediation got all of the mold, and to assure that it stays away, one good idea is to schedule regular mold inspections.
  • If the building you’re moving your business into was unoccupied for an extensive amount of time. Mold may have been caused due to a build-up of humidity within an unoccupied building.
  • Any time a new building is purchased, unless you’re informed of it, you can never be sure if water damage was ever a problem. Having a mold inspection will assure you that no mold exists; or if it does, you can get it taken care of right away.

What Can I Do about a Mold Problem in My Commercial Building?

Fortunately, if you are experiencing a mold problem in your building – or if you would simply like to schedule an inspection to be sure – it’s easy to contact and schedule a visit by the experts at Iris Environmental Laboratories. We also do asbestos testing.

If you’d like to find out more, click here.

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When Does Mold Exposure Become Dangerous?

Detrimental things can happen to our health whenever we are exposed to hazardous materials. However, this article will talk about the dangers of mold and when mold exposure become dangerous for us. It is important to note that mold is present everywhere, mold growth typically occurs in places that are humid. While mold does have an important part to play in the ecosystem (helping to decay matter), mold exposure can be extremely harmful to our health. This might result in great anxiety to people who might be exposed to mold on a daily basis in their workplace. This is why it is so beneficial to get a professional tester to conduct a mold inspection for your facility.

Common Types of Mold

There are many different kinds of mold that can be harmful to our bodies when we are subjected to prolonged exposure. Some of the most common types of mold include Stachybotrys Chartarum, Cladosporium and Penicillium. This is especially so whenever there is a moist environment for the mold to grow and reproduce. In these environments, you might be exposed to the mold spores and experience respiratory issues such as breathing difficulties and wheezing. You might also start to develop allergies to the mold and a weakened immune system. However, when does it start becoming dangerous?

The Dangers of Mold

We first have to understand that mold is not dangerous on its own. What is causing these health problems is actually the exposure to the mold spores and the mycotoxins. For most of the ones who experience adverse reactions to mold exposure, it is usually because they are already allergic to the mold or have pre-existing health conditions such as asthma or HIV. Note also that prolonged exposure to damp environments can have detrimental impact on your lung function. However, some people might not even see any symptoms.

Mold Allergies

Allergies to mold can be caused by breathing in mold spores for prolonged periods. This might cause your immune system to react badly and overreact. As a result of this, you might feel more unhealthy and this shows itself in the body as allergies.

Some of the things that you might experience include congestion, irritation in the throat and nose, non-stop sneezing and coughing, and watery eyes. As mentioned, mold exposure is most likely a bad thing for people who already have pre-existing health conditions. They might experience more serious symptoms like fevers and pneumonia.

Mold Poisoning

Usually, most of us associate black mold with the ill-effects of mold exposure. Black mold, or Stachybotrys Chartarum, is usually found in places with water damage. When the mold spores of this strain of fungi starts to reproduce, it produces mycotoxins. When we are exposed to mycotoxins in dangerous quantities, we might be at higher risk of mold poisoning. Some of the symptoms of mold poisoning include skin rashes, chronic fatigue, stiffness in the joints, unexplained weight gain and even numbness.

Bottom Line

The danger of mold is that it can be impossible to spot. The spores are airborne and microscopic. This means that we are always in danger of a mold infestation. If you are exposed to mold spores for prolonged periods of time, chances are that you will see a decline in health and symptoms of allergies and mold poisoning.

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What To Expect In A Professional Mold Inspection

Mold inspections, whether in a commercial building or home environment, are an essential part of taking care of the people who use the premises. If it’s your commercial building and the employees who work there are in danger, a mold problem can open you up to a lawsuit. Naturally, there is also the human element and caring culture of your business to consider.

In your home, you want your family to receive the best care possible and be safe. Inspecting for mold, even if you only suspect a “small problem”, can be one of the most important moves you make.

But what should you expect if you schedule a professional mold inspection? We are going to run through the basics, so you know what’s coming when the mold inspector calls.

Mold Inspections – Elements and Objectives

Mold inspection objectives consist of two relatively broad factors. These are:

  • Assess exposure potentials for occupants.
  • Regarding the indoor environment, assess its condition.

There are five elements within these objectives that are considered basic. They are:

  • Inspect the site.
  • Record any history of incidents.
  • Execute a detailed inspection visually.
  • Interview the occupant.
  • Have a plan for sampling.

Mold Inspectors And Their Inspection

Very generally speaking, the person that is inspecting for mold will have a detailed conversation with the owner of the property.

  • In the past, has there been any water damage?
  • If you had any moisture problems, where have they been?
  • Have you actually seen mold?

Following this, looking in particular at mold prone areas, the entire house will be gone over thoroughly by the inspector. Inspections of both the interior and exterior of your home are common because water can start to enter your home from out-of-doors. It can also, however, be a plumbing leak or problem.

What You Shouldn’t Do

If you’ve noticed mold growth, no matter how tidy you like your household, do not clean it up before the inspector gets there. It’s going to be vital for them to see the mold for themselves so that they can try to determine the cause/origin. Any water stains should also be left if possible, for the very same reason. Water stains mean moisture, moisture means mold.

Even though you’re concerned about the health of your family, before the inspection, air quality aids should be shut off and extra ventilation avoided. Try not to move anything around, either. If mold is growing on the side of a piece of furniture, its location could be crucial to finding the source of the mold problem.

Expect out-of-the-way places of your home to be accessed. This can include basements, crawlspaces, attics, and any boarded off sections that may exist. The inspector will want to look at every available possibility for mold origins throughout your entire building.

Expect the Best from Iris Environmental Laboratories

For one of the most reliable methods of getting rid of mold, start by contacting Iris Environmental Laboratories! To get the ball rolling on your mold remediation, so you know where and how to start the process, we will execute a thorough mold inspection and provide you with a full report.

To find out more about our mold inspections (or asbestos inspections), give us a call at 1800-908-6679. You can also fill out our online form. One of our consultants will be happy to contact you.

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What Happens When Young Children Are Exposed To Mold?

Our children will always be our top priority especially when safety is concerned. No parent who would not go to great lengths to ensure their children live in the most conducive and safest environment. Nevertheless, how do we become aware of how safe our home truly is for our young ones and whether they are indeed exposed to mold on a daily basis or otherwise?

Favorite Spots of Mold

Being aware of the ill-effects of mold is truly essential. This will create a sense of wanting to keep mold prevention at bay in order to safeguard the well-being of your children. Mold can easily grow and thrive in hidden areas where we least expect like air ducts, wood, carpeting, drywall, paper, or any surface that is constantly exposed to moisture. Thus, make it a point to check under the kitchen sinks or bathroom regularly to get rid of any mold spores.

Terrible Effects of Mold in Children

Children are at a stage whereby their body is still developing and so is their immunity. Hence, children are more prone to suffer from the ill-effects of mold as compared to adults. The main point that you need to be aware of is that the diseases related to mold are pretty common in children. This makes it easy for parents to simply dismiss any mold symptoms present in children as nothing critical. Parents may see their children sneezing, wheezing, or coughing, but they are thought to be caused by the flu instead of mold. For more severe cases, children may even suffer from more harmful effects of toxic mold.

Allergies

Apart from sneezing, wheezing, and coughing, there are plenty more symptoms that mold causes. One of them shows when your children experience rashes when they are in close contact with mold. However, do not be alarmed if you are certain that your home does not have any signs of mold for you to suspect that your children are indeed suffering from mold allergies. If unsure, always seek the advice of mold experts who can perform a test.

Respiratory Problems

It is highly common in children to develop pneumonia, croup, or bronchitis whenever there is mold growth that is caused by water damage. Pneumonia is an inflammation of the tissues inside the lungs, croup is a blockage of the trachea that causes shortness of breath, and bronchitis is when the bronchial tubes are inflamed that causes dry coughing and wheezing. There is a direct link between moisture levels in a home to higher risks of respiratory symptoms in children. This is when a damp environment causes high levels of mold which in turn leads to respiratory symptoms.

Immediate Action

If you suspect your children are reacting to mold, seek the advice of medical experts immediately. A pediatrician can arrange for a mold test to be done at your home to confirm if the symptoms experienced by your children are indeed related to mold growth.

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What Happens When You Are Exposed To Black Mold?

Although many people think that exposure to black mold is extremely harmful to our health, there is actually not much evidence to back this statement up. The truth is, there is not much research that can prove that black mold causes cancer and lung disease. Mold can be found almost everywhere with the existence of airborne mold spores. When they are found in healthy amounts, they do not pose a threat to our bodies. However, it is true that some people are definitely more sensitive and susceptible to the effects of mold exposure. This is why you should definitely get a mold test done for your office or commercial building.

What is Black Mold?

Black mold actually just refers to a type of mold called Stachybotrys chartarum. While there are no research findings to back up the idea that the exposure to this type of mold is more dangerous than others, some people are just more sensitive to the mold spores. As a result, this group of people might develop respiratory problems after inhaling the mold spores. However, exposure to a large amount of mold spores could cause adverse health effects to people. Thus, we should all be concerned about preventing exposure to mold and taking the necessary actions to ensure that there are no mold infestations.

Is Black Mold Harmful?

Most people believe that toxic mold or black mold can lead to dangerous health issues. This is because they believe that the mycotoxins can affect our bodies in a detrimental manner. There are some researchers who have found a correlation between exposure to these mycotoxins and bad health. One of these problems include mycotoxicosis, which is the medical term for mold poisoning. However, mold exposure has been known to cause other health issues such as the following:

  • Unexplained pains and aches
  • Serious headaches
  • Mood swings
  • Nosebleeds
  • Unexplained memory loss

Possible Allergies

If you already have allergies, chances are that you would be more sensitive to mold exposure than other people. When you come into contact with mold spores, you might experience the following symptoms:

  • Irritation to the nose causing a blocked or a runny nose
  • Dry cough
  • Watery and bloodshot eyes
  • Rashes on any part of your body
  • Difficulties in breathing
  • Sinusitis
  • Sore throat

If you have more serious allergies to mold, you might find that these symptoms can become more severe. This is also true for people with pre-existing medical conditions such as asthmatic people and individuals with lung problems. For people with a normal, healthy immune system, normal exposure to such molds should not pose that big a threat. On the other hand, if you are suffering from chronic illness or undergoing medical treatment, you might be at a higher risk of infection. If you happen to fall under these categories, it would be wise to hire a professional to check for mold infestations.

Toxicity of Mold

The common misconception is that black mold is the only type of mold that is dangerous to us. However, most molds can produce mycotoxins. Typically, mycotoxicosis can occur when you ingest foods that have become moldy. In more rare cases, people have gotten serious illnesses and even died from fungal exposure at home.

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Unexpected Places That May Have Asbestos

It is easy to make an assumption that asbestos exposure is truly a thing of the past and majority of Americans think that asbestos had been banned since a long time ago. However, this is so far away from the actual reality that we have to face today. Asbestos use is highly regulated in the U.S. but it is far from being banned. Only certain products like flooring felt, commercial paper, and spray-on insulation are banned from containing any traces of asbestos. Other products which mostly are construction materials are still legally allowed to contain asbestos. Several buildings may still contain asbestos so let us explore more about these structures.

Churches

Church buildings mainly make use of asbestos for soundproofing and prevention of fire. Soundproofing is not often associated with the reason why people add asbestos to products but this mineral is added to most acoustical panels due to its durability. Acoustical panels used to be fixed onto walls as well as on ceilings to cushion echoes and music that is played in churches.

Schools

Asbestos is so widespread in schools that the United States government came up with a separate set of regulations in the year 1986 to safeguard children and school staff from the ill-effects of asbestos. The Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) requires that schools inspect their building for materials that contain asbestos, produce asbestos management plans, and take necessary action to reduce asbestos exposure.

Public Buildings

Any public building that was build before 1980s is most likely to contain traces of asbestos through the use of construction materials that contain asbestos. However, newer buildings may also contain asbestos as roofing materials, cement piping, and vinyl tiles are manufactured with asbestos. Several examples of public buildings that contain asbestos are police stations, restaurants, government buildings, movie theaters, hair salons, barbershops, airports, and shopping malls.

Hospitals

Hospital buildings made use of asbestos to help in the prevention of fires as well as keeping of medical equipment from overheating. Any hospital staff may come into contact with these products but the workers to be at full risk of asbestos exposure are maintenance workers. Insulation, HVAC, and floor tiles of hospitals are where asbestos is usually found.

Your Home

There is a high chance that our home contains traces of asbestos even when it had just been built. People often relate asbestos with older homes, but numerous newer homes are also built with asbestos materials. The most common construction materials today that still contain asbestos include sheets and pipes, cement shingles, flooring and roofing materials, millboard, and pipeline wrap. Hundreds of older construction materials were manufactured with asbestos products and they include insulation, ceilings, plumbing fixtures, vinyl tiles, plaster, electrical panels, and drywall.

Regardless of where you are, always be aware of your surroundings. Do not perform asbestos removal on your own as its fibers may get unknowingly released into the air waiting for you to inhale.

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Understanding The Dangers Of Secondary Asbestos Exposure

Asbestos is commonly found and widely used in thousands of products, ranging from construction materials to everyday consumer goods. Individuals are most commonly exposes to asbestos in their workplaces, but product exposure, environmentally exposure, and secondary exposure are all continued risks to the general public.

What is Asbestos?

Asbestos is a natural mineral that can potentially cause serious health problems when fibers become airborne, such as malignant mesothelioma. More often than not, exposure to asbestos happen in the workplace. However, it is not limited to the workplace, and anyone can come into contact and be exposed to asbestos in buildings, products or even their own homes. Since asbestos is not banned, exposure to asbestos poses as a health threat in the United States.

Secondary Asbestos Exposure

Secondary asbestos exposure is a form of non-occupational exposure to asbestos fibers. Other names for secondary asbestos exposure includes secondhand exposure, non-occupational, para-occupational exposure, and take-home exposure. When secondary asbestos are being repeatedly exposed, it can result in asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma, asbestosis, and asbestos lung cancer.

Secondary asbestos exposure accounts for approximately 20 percent of the mesothelioma cases – which occurs when individuals bring home asbestos fibers and it get stained on their clothes, hair or skin. These fivers can cling onto our skin and the fabrics of our clothes which make them transferable to others who have not been exposed at all.

Most At-Risk Populations

There are certain populations that are more at-risk of secondary asbestos exposure than the others. Individuals who have been living with asbestos workers and have experienced secondary asbestos exposure are twice as likely to develop asbestos-related diseases such as mesothelioma than the general public.

Besides living with an asbestos worker, studies have found that women are more likely to be impacted by secondary asbestos exposure. A 2017 study found that 64 percent of the female mesothelioma patients had experienced secondary exposure as compared to only 12 percent of the male patients who were exposed to asbestos secondhand.

Sources of Secondary Asbestos Exposure

Cars: Family members can experience secondary asbestos exposure when riding in the car if asbestos-contaminated items or people enter a car, the car may then contain the fibers.

Clothing: Did you know that the act of washing clothing can cause domestic exposure? Asbestos fibers may transfer from one or two contaminated clothing to the entire laundry load, exposing both the person washing the clothes and those who are going to wear those contaminated clothing.

Furniture: Furniture such as beds, chairs, and couches can all be contaminated with asbestos fibers which result to household exposure. If an asbestos worker uses the furniture with their contaminated clothing, it may result in toxin transfer.

How We Can Help

Iris Environmental Laboratories provide asbestos inspection services to help our clients in remediating their asbestos problems. Call now at 1800-908-6679 to find out more on our asbestos inspection services or fill up our online form to be contacted by our consultants.

Asbestos is commonly found and widely used in thousands of products, ranging from construction materials to everyday consumer goods. Individuals are most commonly exposes to asbestos in their workplaces, but product exposure, environmentally exposure, and secondary exposure are all continued risks to the general public.

What is Asbestos?

Asbestos is a natural mineral that can potentially cause serious health problems when fibers become airborne, such as malignant mesothelioma. More often than not, exposure to asbestos happen in the workplace. However, it is not limited to the workplace, and anyone can come into contact and be exposed to asbestos in buildings, products or even their own homes. Since asbestos is not banned, exposure to asbestos poses as a health threat in the United States.

Secondary Asbestos Exposure

Secondary asbestos exposure is a form of non-occupational exposure to asbestos fibers. Other names for secondary asbestos exposure includes secondhand exposure, non-occupational, para-occupational exposure, and take-home exposure. When secondary asbestos are being repeatedly exposed, it can result in asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma, asbestosis, and asbestos lung cancer.

Secondary asbestos exposure accounts for approximately 20 percent of the mesothelioma cases – which occurs when individuals bring home asbestos fibers and it get stained on their clothes, hair or skin. These fivers can cling onto our skin and the fabrics of our clothes which make them transferable to others who have not been exposed at all.

Most At-Risk Populations

There are certain populations that are more at-risk of secondary asbestos exposure than the others. Individuals who have been living with asbestos workers and have experienced secondary asbestos exposure are twice as likely to develop asbestos-related diseases such as mesothelioma than the general public.

Besides living with an asbestos worker, studies have found that women are more likely to be impacted by secondary asbestos exposure. A 2017 study found that 64 percent of the female mesothelioma patients had experienced secondary exposure as compared to only 12 percent of the male patients who were exposed to asbestos secondhand.

Sources of Secondary Asbestos Exposure

Cars: Family members can experience secondary asbestos exposure when riding in the car if asbestos-contaminated items or people enter a car, the car may then contain the fibers.

Clothing: Did you know that the act of washing clothing can cause domestic exposure? Asbestos fibers may transfer from one or two contaminated clothing to the entire laundry load, exposing both the person washing the clothes and those who are going to wear those contaminated clothing.

Furniture: Furniture such as beds, chairs, and couches can all be contaminated with asbestos fibers which result to household exposure. If an asbestos worker uses the furniture with their contaminated clothing, it may result in toxin transfer.

How We Can Help

Iris Environmental Laboratories provide asbestos inspection services to help our clients in remediating their asbestos problems. Call now at 1800-908-6679 to find out more on our asbestos inspection services or fill up our online form to be contacted by our consultants.

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Preventing Asbestos Exposure When Remodeling Your Home

If you’re an avid do-it-yourselfer, remodeling your home on your own can be a fulfilling project, giving you a true sense of accomplishment. To completely enjoy the rewards of doing your own remodeling, it needs to be a project completed with every safety precaution in place. It would never do, after all, to receive a devastating injury or contract a horrible affliction because you chose to do the work yourself.

In the interest of protecting whoever remodels your home, preventing asbestos exposure will be a crucial element. Asbestos can be found in many older homes and commercial buildings. It was generously utilized during construction until the 1970s.

Asbestos in Your Building

Widely used in building materials such as roof tiles, flooring, and insulation, from the 1940s to the 70s, asbestos is a fiber that was put to “good” use in a big way! When it comes to asbestos exposure, there is no safe level, according to the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency). Including asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma, serious illnesses can result from exposure to asbestos.

There’s a good chance that your home contains asbestos-containing materials if it was built prior to 1978. Even in more recent construction, however, asbestos may be found.

Is It Made of Asbestos?

So, how do you know if something has asbestos in it? You can’t tell by looking, generally speaking. Who knows what to look for? Professionals who are accredited and trained in asbestos removal. If you disturb the asbestos by taking your own samples, you could cause it to become airborne. Taking samples can be more dangerous than leaving the material alone when performed incorrectly.

Not sure? Look at it this way. Your home could contain asbestos – and probably does – if it was constructed prior to 1978. If the materials have not been damaged, you may be safe. But you want to be sure.

Follow These Remodeling Rules

To protect yourself against asbestos exposure during your remodeling project, follow these dos and don’ts:

  • Do avoid the construction zone if someone else is doing your project. If it simply cannot be avoided, use a wet mop for cleanup.
  • Don’t remove, level, or sand asbestos flooring. An accredited asbestos professional trained in abatement can remove the floor. Or, the asbestos-containing flooring can have new flooring installed over it.
  • Don’t use brushes or abrasive pads on flooring that contains asbestos. On any flooring that you think may contain asbestos, don’t use a power stripper.
  • In any material that you feel might contain asbestos, don’t drill holes, sand, or scrape.
  • Do use an abatement professional who is accredited in asbestos removal for even minor repairs and removal of materials.
  • Until it can be remediated, do keep activities to a minimum in an area where you feel damaged asbestos-containing material exists. Don’t vacuum, sweep, or dust the debris.
  • Do avoid damaging any building materials that are currently undamaged.

Count on Iris Environmental Laboratories For an Inspection

Are you planning a remodeling project? Is there even the slightest chance that there could be materials within your home that contain asbestos? If you have even the remotest of doubts, schedule an asbestos inspection today, before you get your project rolling.

Another problem that many homes today have is mold. If you’d like to schedule a mold inspection, we do that, too. Regardless of whether you’re worried about mold or asbestos, we’ve got you covered.

Contact us today if you like to schedule an appointment or with any questions you may have.

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Is It A Good Idea To Conduct Mold Testing Yourself?

You suspect there is mold growing somewhere in the place you work at. There is also a musty smell that just won’t go away. Now, should you go ahead with conducting mold testing on your own, or are you better off hiring an expert to deal with the matter? Though you are fairly certain it is mold invading your workplace, you still want to test for it.

Understand the Types of Mold Testing

Air Sampling: Mold experts collect indoor air samples from your home using air sampling. A control sample is taken from the outside of your home. Then, a comparison is made between the indoor and outdoor samples to come to a conclusion whether there are elevated mold levels spores present in the home that are not naturally found in the outdoors.

Tape Swab Test: The tape swab test is used to determine which type of mold is present. Unlike the other tests, this test does not identify spore counts, which is essential to finding out if there are elevated levels of mold in your home. The tape swab test uses a cotton material swab to wipe the surface to be tested. Then, the swab is sent for lab examination.

Lift Tape Sample: As the name suggests, the lift tape sample includes using a piece of tape and placing it onto any areas to be tested. Then, it is lifted and placed on a glass micro slide. Lastly, the tape slide is then sealed and examined by a microbiology laboratory for the presence of mold spore.

Can I Do Mold Testing On My Own?

The answer is yes. You can do your own assessment with the help of home mold test kits. These mold test kits claim that they are able to detect the presence of harmful mods that can trigger serious health probbles. However, do not that home testing tools are not considered statistically accurate and sometimes they produce a large number of false positives. What is meant by a false positive is that the home test will claim you have a mold problem in your home when in actual reality you don’t have elevated levels of mold.

To have a absolute piece of mind, it is best that you contact a professional for help. Professionals have the proper tools to conduct the different types of mold tests as required by the situation.

When to Conduct Mold Testing

Ideally, you should conduct mold testing under these conditions:

  • Visible signs of mold growth
  • Chronic respiratory illnesses
  • Musty odors – suspected microbial growth
  • Occurrence of water-related problems

Awareness of the mold problem is the key to preventing mold growth. If you are vigilant with your surroundings and you are diligent in checking for any signs of mold growth, you can overcome or prevent mold growth.

How We Can Help

At Iris Environmental Laboratories, we provide mold inspection service for our clients. If you do not trust the accuracy of the mold testing kits, we are here to do the work for you. Contact us at 1800-908-6679 to find out more on our mold inspection services or fill up our online form to be contacted by our consultants.

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