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All Posts in Category: Asbestos

7 Hidden Asbestos (ACMs) in Old Homes

Whether you’re looking to buy or renovate an older home, you could be up against a few hidden asbestos problems that aren’t usually a concern in newer homes. That’s because asbestos-containing materials (ACMs) were popularly used in homes built before 1980. Although asbestos is an effective and flame-resistant insulator, it is, unfortunately, a serious health hazard.

Before you commit to buying that charming older home you love or beginning a reno project, you’ll want to have your home tested for asbestos in materials like these.

1. Insulation (ACMs)

Before we knew just how hazardous asbestos exposure could be, this material was the primary type of insulation used in homes, schools, and other buildings built before 1980. As long as they are left undisturbed, though, existing ACMs are not believed to pose a health risk. However, if you plan to renovate an older home, you’ll want to hire professional asbestos testing and asbestos abatement companies to detect and remove the problem first.

2. Textured Ceiling Tiles (ACMs)

Also called “popcorn” or “cottage cheese” ceilings, textured ceilings often contain asbestos. This unique look used to be in style, but because many homeowners now want an updated look, ACMs lurking in textured ceiling tiles could pose a health risk if not tested and properly remediated first.

3. Vinyl Floors (ACMs)

Some vinyl flooring backing and adhesives might also contain asbestos. Before redoing the floors in an older home, it’s a good idea to have a certified asbestos inspector come in and make sure it’s safe to tear up the old floors and give them a fresh new look.

4. Hot Water and Steam Pipes (ACMs)

Since asbestos was so widely used as an insulator, some older hot water, and steam pipes could also contain traces of this dangerous material.

5. Oil and Coal Furnaces (ACMs)

Similarly, oil and coal furnaces could still have their original asbestos insulation. If you plan on ripping yours out and replacing it with a newer furnace, call in an asbestos inspector first.

6. Roofing and Shingles (ACMs)

Some roofing and siding shingles used to be made with what’s called asbestos cement, which is essentially a mixture of asbestos and regular cement. You might also find this material in corrugated roofing and drain pipes.

Some types of asbestos, particularly white asbestos or chrysotile, were banned much later than other types, so buildings as new as 1999 could contain asbestos cement.

7. Walls and Floors around Wood Burners (ACMs)

Wood burners can be an efficient way to heat your home in the winter, especially if natural gas isn’t available where you live. But if there are older cement sheets or millboard surrounding your wood burner, you could have a hidden asbestos problem on your hands.

How Do I Find an Asbestos Testing Laboratory Near Me?

If you think your older home might contain asbestos and you’re planning to renovate, it’s important that you find a reputable asbestos testing laboratory in your area to ensure your family’s safety. Look for a full-accredited environmental laboratory that has experienced professionals who know, understand, and follow the highest safety standards when testing for asbestos.

Feel free to give IRIS Environmental Laboratories a call today at 1(800) 908-6679, or contact us online for more information on how to get started with your asbestos inspection.

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Home Asbestos Testing Kits or Hiring a Professional?

Asbestos testing is now routine before beginning a renovation project or even before having extensive plumbing or electrical work done on your own. When it comes to testing your home for asbestos, you have two main options. One is to get a home testing kit and the other is to hire an asbestos professional.
While it might seem like performing the test yourself could be the way to go, there are actually a number of reasons why bringing in a professional could pay off in the long run.

1. Save Time and Money
Even though the cost of the at-home asbestos test itself might initially be cheaper, you could end up saving both time and money when you rely on a professional instead. Not only is DIY testing not as accurate as professional asbestos testing, but it could also potentially expose you to harmful asbestos particles and therefore put you and your family at risk for asbestos-related health hazards.

2. Professional Asbestos Testing May Be Required in Your Location
Another important factor to consider is that many cities and townships require that homes be tested for asbestos by a licensed environmental laboratory, rather than the homeowner. This is because companies who install flooring, plumbers, electricians, and other workers who have to handle pipes and other materials that are wrapped with insulation want to ensure that they are not putting their employees at risk for asbestos exposure.
Thus, they often require professional testing before proceeding with their work and they will not accept anything less than having a team of professionals testing the materials. If you need to have work done on your home and only have a DIY asbestos test, the project could be delayed until you bring in a professional.

3. The Asbestos Laboratory Is Responsible for Reporting Accurate Results
So why is it so important to many state and local authorities that you use a professional? It’s because they can then hold the licensed environmental laboratory responsible for the accuracy of the test results.
For example, when IRIS Environmental Laboratories provides a final report with our findings, we are placing our licenses on the line by definitively stating, “Yes, there is asbestos,” or “No, there is not.” If anything goes wrong, it falls back on the professionals that performed the inspection, not the homeowner.

Have More Questions about Asbestos Testing?
When it comes to keeping yourself and your family safe from the dangers of asbestos exposure, it’s best to rely on the skill, expertise, and accreditation of a professional instead of trying to perform the test on your own. In the long run, you’ll most likely end up saving time, money, and headaches down the road.

If you still have questions about hiring a professional asbestos inspector, please feel free to contact us at (908)206-0073 or by using our online contact form. We would be happy to answer any questions you might have and help you better understand the asbestos testing process.

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Talc Contains Asbestos – Be Cautious When Buying These Products

Talc is a very soft, naturally-occurring clay mineral that is used to make talcum powder, an ingredient in many different cosmetic, personal care, and household products. However, some talcum powder has been shown to contain a specific type of asbestos called tremolite, which is a toxic substance linked with lung cancer.
Since so many everyday household products contain talc and talcum powder, it’s crucial that you use caution when buying these products to ensure the safety of you and your family. These five common products are known to contain talc, so you may have to do a little digging to determine the source of the talc used in that particular product and whether it has ever been tested for asbestos.

1. Baby Powder
Talcum powder is very good at absorbing moisture, which is why it is the primary ingredient in most baby powders and many feminine hygiene products. While cosmetic-grade talc should not contain asbestos in theory, some samples of baby powder, makeup, and other cosmetic products have tested positive for asbestos.

2. Paint and Coatings
Talc is also widely used in paint, coatings, and sealants either as a filler or to improve functional properties such as weathering protection, scrub resistance, and physical appearance. You can find an extensive list of paint products that contain talc on the FDA’s website. While this isn’t to say that every one of these products necessarily contains asbestos, it is a good idea to do a little research on the talc supplier for that product, or even to have it tested for asbestos prior to use in your home.

3. Pesticides
Some garden pesticides contain talcum powder to repel certain insects that could harm crops and flowers. Unfortunately, pesticides that contain talc with asbestos could also be harmful to you, your family, and your pets.

4. Rubber
Talc is also often used to manufacture many different rubber products, including rubber-backed carpeting. If you are starting a renovation project and will be ripping up old carpet, insulation, and other materials that could contain asbestos, it’s recommended you bring in an asbestos testing company first so that you don’t end up stirring up dangerous asbestos fibers and releasing them into your home.

5. Paper and Plastics
Many papers and plastics contain talc as a filler, a brightening agent, and to improve the opacity of the finished product. Talc can also be used in the paper recycling process, so it’s possible for recycled paper products and plastics to potentially also contain asbestos.

Asbestos Testing
While it can be difficult to avoid using products that contain talc or talcum powder altogether,  you can have these products tested for asbestos by a certified environmental lab so you can have the peace of mind that you and your family are safe from asbestos exposure.

For more information on how to have your home or products tested for asbestos, contact IRIS Environmental Laboratories at (908)206-0073 or using our online contact form.

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Asbestos Found in Children’s Makeup

According to a recent report published just a few days ago by CNN, asbestos was found in several eye shadow and other makeup products marketed towards children from international beauty giant Claire’s. Since the revelation, the company has pulled nine products off its shelves while awaiting third-party asbestos testing results.

So what is asbestos, why is it so dangerous, and what can you do to make sure your family’s makeup and personal care products are safe? Here are some of your most frequently asked questions answered.

What Is Asbestos?
Asbestos is the name given to a group of naturally-occurring minerals that were once widely used in building materials and other products due to their incredible insulating and heat- and flame-resistant qualities. However, it has been found that exposure to asbestos particles poses a serious risk of developing mesothelioma, a type of lung cancer, as well as other health risks.

Although many products are no longer manufactured using asbestos, the effects of asbestos inhalation can take years or even decades to present themselves. Moreover, children and adults alike are still being exposed to this dangerous substance, even in unlikely places like makeup, paints, toys, and other products. The fact of the matter is that people are still dying from asbestos exposure.

How Does Asbestos Wind up in Makeup?
The asbestos that was reportedly found in some Claire’s eye shadow products is most likely linked with contaminated talcum powder, although the company claims that the talcum powder that it uses in its makeup products is safely sourced from Europe.

Nonetheless, talcum powder can be contaminated with a type of asbestos known as tremolite, which is exactly what preliminary tests found in some Claire’s eye shadows. Once these tests are completed, Claire’s has stated that it will then “take the necessary action.”

Asbestos-contaminated talcum powder has also fairly recently been found in some children’s art
supplies and toys, making this a growing problem, despite the fact that we are now well-aware of the risks of asbestos exposure, especially to children.

Can You Have Your Makeup Products Tested for Asbestos?
Yes! Although Claire’s has since pulled the items in question off its shelves until the results of additional asbestos testing come back, you can take an active role in protecting yourself and your family from unknowingly being exposed to asbestos. Environmental testing labs like IRIS Environmental Laboratories can test makeup products for asbestos particles, so one option would be to send a sample of the makeup you’d like to have tested to our lab so that you can know for sure whether or not your children could be in danger of asbestos exposure.

How Can I Get More Information?
If you still have questions about what asbestos is or how you can have your makeup products tested for asbestos, please feel free to contact us online or by phone at (908) 206-0073.
Asbestos inhalation can lead to serious health problems, so catching and stopping exposure as early as possible is the key to reducing these risks and keeping your family safe.

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When Should I Test The Air Quality of My Home?

There are a number of different substances that may be present in your home that could
contribute to poor indoor air quality, including asbestos, lead, radon gas and mold. What’s more
is that not only can these substances lower the quality of the air that you’re breathing each and
every day, but they can also lead to serious health problems.
While this is by no means an extensive list, these five factors are good indicators that it might be
time to get the indoor air quality of your home tested.

1. You’re Experiencing Adverse Health Effects
If you or a family member begins to develop health issues seemingly out of nowhere, asbestos,
lead, radon or mold that’s lurking in your home might be to blame. Some of the most notable
symptoms that are often associated with these dangerous substances include:

  • Coughing and wheezing
  • Sinus congestion
  • Eye or skin irritation
  • Asthma and other respiratory problems
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness

2. Your Allergies Are Flaring Up
People who struggle with allergies may notice that their symptoms begin to flare up when they
are exposed to hazardous materials like asbestos fibers and mold. While there are other
unrelated causes of indoor allergies, such as pet dander and dust mites, unexplained flare-ups
could indicate poor air quality.
Once you have your air tested by a certified professional, you’ll then be armed with the
knowledge you need to remove any potentially dangerous materials or substances from your
home.

3. You’re Planning to Renovate Your Home
Even if you’ve lived in your home for decades and never seemed to have a problem with
asbestos or other harmful materials, as soon as you begin a renovation project, you could stir up
dangerous particles and release them into the air. In fact, asbestos is most dangerous when you
breathe its microscopic particles into your lungs.
Thus, before you start any demolition or renovation project in your home, call in a professional
asbestos testing lab to make sure you’re not going to stir up any of these dangerous particles
during your project. If asbestos-containing materials (ACMs) are detected, you’ll want to hire a
professional to remove them before continuing to ensure the safety of you and your family.

4. You’re Buying a New Home
You may elect to have the indoor air quality tested during a home inspection before purchasing
a new home to make sure you’re not going to be strapped with the cost of installing a radon
remediation system, for example, or dealing with other hazardous issues before you even move
in.

5. You Have Kids
Because their lungs are still developing and they breathe in more air in each breath than adults
do, children are even more susceptible to health complications due to asbestos, lead, mold and
radon exposure. If you have, getting an air quality test could give you the peace of mind you’re
looking for.

How to Test the Air Quality in Your Home
If you’re concerned about poor indoor air quality, the first step is to contact a certified
environmental laboratory to have your air tested. If hazardous substances such as asbestos,
lead, radon gas or mold are discovered through testing, the next step is to hire an experienced,
trained professional to remediate the situation so that you and your family can safely breathe
clean air.
For more information on asbestos, mold or air quality testing, contact IRIS Environmental
Laboratories at (908)206-0073 or using our online contact form.

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Asbestos – High Risk Occupations

Asbestos, which is a naturally-occurring substance known for its ability to resist heat and corrosion, is no longer used in most modern building materials because of its serious health risks. However, many workers can still be exposed to this harmful substance on a regular basis, so it’s crucial that employers in these fields take extra precautions to keep their employees safe. Outlined below are just some of the most high-risk occupations for exposure to asbestos.

Construction Workers

One of the most at-risk jobs for asbestos exposure is construction, especially for workers who are involved in demolition of any kind. That’s because asbestos-containing materials (ACMs) are most harmful when they are disturbed and their fibers are released into the air.

Since asbestos was very commonly used in building materials such as insulation, dry wall and shingles up until the 1980s, any structures built within this time period should be treated as though they do contain asbestos. This should involve professional asbestos testing and abatement to ensure worker safety.

Electricians

Asbestos was also commonly used to insulate electrical wires due to its flame-resistant quality. Because of this, electricians who work in old construction could be at a high risk for asbestos exposure, and special care should be taken when removing old insulation and wiring from homes and other structures.

Plumbers

Pipe insulation is another building material that frequently contains asbestos, especially in older buildings, which can put plumbers at risk for coming into contact with ACMs while they work.

Auto Mechanics

Many people don’t realize that asbestos can also be found in some brake pads, linings and various gaskets. Thus, when working with these materials, auto mechanics could be exposed to asbestos in the workplace.

Firefighters

Because firefighters enter buildings that may be burning or are otherwise damaged, they can be at a very high risk for asbestos exposure. However, proper equipment can help to protect firefighters from breathing in asbestos fibers, smoke and other dangerous substances.

Teachers

Older school buildings contain ACMs, so teachers can run the risk of being exposed to asbestos fibers in the classroom if these materials are disturbed.

Additionally, some art supplies have been found to contain asbestos, including powder paints or glaze, clay and wheat paste. Art teachers should take special care when choosing supplies for their classes and when working with any existing supplies that could contain asbestos.

Asbestos Exposure Symptoms

If you work in an environment where your risk of asbestos exposure is high, it’s a good idea to familiarize yourself with the symptoms of asbestos exposure. Some of the most notable signs include:

  • A persistent cough
  • Chest pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • “Clubbing” fingers or toes

How IRIS Environmental Laboratories Can Help

If you or your workers could be exposed to ACMs on a regular basis, a crucial step in ensuring employee safety is to have the space or materials checked for asbestos. When you work with IRIS Environmental Laboratories, a certified and trained professional will be sent to find asbestos containing materials.

To learn more about how to get started with this process, feel free to contact us online or give us a call at (908) 206-0073.

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Are People Still Dying from Asbestos?

Despite the fact that regulations have been in place since 1971 regarding how much asbestos workers can be exposed to and what types of asbestos-containing materials (ACMs) can still be manufactured, up to 15,000 Americans are still dying from asbestos exposure each year. Not only are many workers still at risk, but many families could also still be exposed to ACMs that are within the four walls, flooring and ceiling tiles of their homes.

For this reason, familiarizing yourself with the potential risks of asbestos exposure as well as the proper way to test for and get rid of ACMs in your home, business or other structure are crucial steps in minimizing your and your family’s risk of asbestos exposure and associated health complications. Read this article for more information.

How Can I Be Exposed to Asbestos?

Asbestos becomes the most dangerous and biggest health threat when its tiny particles are dispersed into the air. Thus, any time you disturb asbestos-containing materials that might already be in your home during a renovation, for example, you and your family could be at risk for inhaling the harmful particles. This is why calling in professional asbestos testing and asbestos abatement teams are an important first step before starting any major demolition or renovation project yourself.

Additionally, many workers are still being exposed to asbestos on a regular basis, especially those who work with older structures and building materials. Some of the highest-risk occupations for health problems associated with asbestos include:

  • Construction workers
  • Electricians
  • Plumbers
  • Mechanics
  • Teachers

What Are the Health Effects of Asbestos?

A specific type of lung cancer called mesothelioma remains the leading cause of asbestos-related deaths, and has accounted for more than 45,000 deaths in the United States between 1999 and 2015.  The first signs of mesothelioma can take years or even decades to develop, which is why this disease is more commonly seen among people over 85.

However, there continue to be cases of people as young as 35 who are beginning to show signs of the negative effects of asbestos, which means that people today are still being exposed to this dangerous substance. In fact, children are at the greatest risk for developing asbestos-related health issues later in life, as their lungs and respiratory systems are still developing.

In addition to mesothelioma and other types of lung cancers, asbestos can negatively affect your health in many ways, including:

  • The formation of plaques in the lining of the lungs
  • A condition known as “folded lung”
  • Increased risk of developing laryngitis
  • Reduced immune system function

IRIS Environmental Laboratories

The bottom line is that many people don’t realize that asbestos is not a thing of the past—it remains a very real public health threat today. If special care is not taken when working with or around ACMs, you could risk developing related health complications down the road.

If you’re about to start a home renovation project or are concerned about ACMs in the workplace and the safety of your employees, start by having the space tested for asbestos by a certified environmental testing laboratory. Then, if asbestos is found, hire a team of asbestos abatement professionals to properly handle and remove it from your home or other building.

Still have questions about the effects of asbestos or how to initiate the asbestos testing process? Please feel free to send us a message, or give us a call at (908) 206-0073.

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How Can Asbestos Affect Your Child’s Future?

When most people think of asbestos exposure, an image of an older person who may have been exposed to asbestos containing materials (ACMs) decades ago is typically what first comes to mind. But the reality is that any home or other structure that was built prior to 1980 could still contain asbestos, meaning that you and your family could still be at risk for asbestos exposure.

What’s even more concerning is that asbestos exposure at a young age can pose serious health risks as your child develops, although the first recognizable signs might not show up until 20 years later. Fortunately, as a parent, there are some steps you can take to help minimize this risk and keep your family safe.

Recognizing the Risks of Asbestos Exposure in Children

The main health risk that asbestos poses for both adults and children is the potential to develop mesothelioma—a specific form of lung cancer—and other types of cancers later in life. With children, however, this risk is even greater, as their lungs and respiratory system are still in the developing stages.

In addition, according to the Children’s Environmental Health Project, children are at a greater risk for breathing in harmful particles, including asbestos fibers, because their smaller lungs have a higher surface area to volume ratio than do adults. Children also have a faster breathing rate than adults, which means that they can breathe in even more potentially dangerous particles with each breath.

Finally, children also tend to put their fingers in their mouths without thinking about what might be on them, so it is possible that they could accidentally ingest asbestos fibers if they’ve touched or played with materials that contain asbestos particles.

Preventing Asbestos Exposure in the Home

To minimize the risk that you or your family members could be exposed to asbestos fibers, you should first determine if your house contains any of these building materials that commonly contain asbestos:

  • Laminate floor tiles
  • Stucco
  • Cement sheet
  • Boiler, furnace, or pipe insulation
  • Original roof shingles, ceiling tiles, or siding

If your home was built before 1980 and contains these materials, there is a good chance that there may be asbestos in your home. Before you panic, though, know that the real danger of ACMs is when these materials are disturbed and therefore can release the dangerous asbestos fibers into the air. Because of this, the best way to handle ACMs in your home is to avoid touching or removing these materials and call in a professional asbestos testing laboratory.

Your home can be tested for asbestos in three simple steps. First, a trained and certified professional will conduct a thorough inspection of your home, as well as perform an air quality test if needed. Next, samples will be taken and sent to the asbestos testing lab, which will then provide you with an easy-to-understand report.

If the results of your testing find that there are asbestos containing materials in your home, you are encouraged to hire a professional asbestos remediation company to safely remove the dangerous materials. Once all remediation is complete, your asbestos testing company will perform a Clearance Air test to make sure that all traces of asbestos particles have been removed from your home.

Not only is this a much safer way of dealing with asbestos in your home than trying to tackle the problem yourself, but working with a professional asbestos testing lab will also give you the peace of mind that you and your children are safe in your own home. Contact our Lab to receive more information or to answer any questions you may have. Our Certified Field Inspectors are ready to tackle any job you may have. There’s no need for you to do this alone.

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Makeup Products Test Positive for Asbestos

It’s a hard pill to swallow when you hear that everyday make up is currently testing positive for asbestos. You might think to yourself, “How is that even possible?” or “Who would purposely place asbestos into cosmetics?!”  As if that’s not scary enough, tween cosmetics are also turning up positive for Tremolite asbestos fibers! This means when you purchase a makeup kit for your daughter, niece, granddaughter, or little cousin for their birthday’s or Christmas, there’s a chance they are applying asbestos directly onto their faces. Keep reading to get more details on what to look out for and how asbestos is making its way into our cosmetics.

 

So, How Does Asbestos Even Get Into Makeup?

Talc is a mineral that is mined around the U.S. and was often found to have the presence of tremolite asbestos within it. While many domestic manufacturers have taken safety measures to prevent levels of tremolite in their mined talc to later be used for cosmetic products, foreign manufacturers tend to have less environmental regulations on asbestos use and allow contaminated products to enter the country. Talc, a common ingredient in cosmetics, is a naturally occurring mineral often mined near asbestos deposits on the earth’s surface. Sometimes, the two substances mix.

 

Who is Producing These Cosmetics?

Justice, a national retail chain marketed to young girls, has stopped selling a cosmetics product after discovering it contained talc contaminated with asbestos fibers. The tainted product was Just Shine Shimmer Powder, which the company stopped selling at stores and removed from its website, according to a Tuesday post on its Facebook page.

 

Recent lab tests show that kids’ face paint and makeup still contain frightening ingredients like arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and lead. The Campaign also found other creepy chemicals, such as toxic VOCs (volatile organic compounds), and known carcinogens and endocrine disruptors, lurking both on and off the label of kids’ Halloween and play makeup.

 

HEALTH CONCERNS: Cancer, endocrine disruption, developmental and reproductive toxicity, bioaccumulation, eco-toxicity.

How Can You Avoid Carcinogens in Cosmetics?

Read labels and avoid cosmetics and personal care products containing formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasing preservatives (quaternium-15, diazolidinyl urea, imidazolidinyl urea, DMDM hydantoin, and 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3 diol), phenacetin, coal tar, benzene, untreated or mildly treated mineral oils, ethylene oxide, chromium, cadmium and its compounds, arsenic and crystalline silica (or quartz).

 

With Holidays Approaching Fast…

Help us pass along this information to your friends and family so they can also be aware of the dangers lurking in talc containing products! Don’t let the people you care about be the next victim.

For more information on asbestos containing makeup, and ways you can have your loved one’s products tested, please contact our support team or give us a call at (908) 206-0073 today!

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Asbestos & Real Estate

asbestos-and-real-estateAs a realtor your job is very important and the kind of relationship you form with your clients will really play a part in the sales that you make. Asbestos and real estate can sometimes go hand in hand. It’s important for your clients to feel comfortable and safe with you when they are going through the process of buying a home. As a realtor, it’s a good idea to have a network of trustworthy companies you can refer out to when needed. For instance what would happen to your potential sale, your buyers and your sellers, if a house you’re trying to sell has asbestos? Check out the rest of this article to learn why it’s important for you to be knowledgeable about asbestos and real estate and how we can help!

How Home Inspections Effect A Realtor

As the realtor you play a very significant role in the home buying process. Most people whether they are the buyer or the seller will look to their real estate agent for advice. You are the person who will help them make important decisions and guide them through a process they probably aren’t familiar with. When buying and selling a home, having knowledge in many areas throughout the process can only help your reputation as a realtor. It’s important that you can refer your clients to other professionals that may be involved in the process.

A home inspection is a crucial part of buying a home. It’s when the true condition of the home is documented for the buyer and seller to review. There’s always going to be something the inspector finds, but sometimes it’s not always something little or fixable. Finding asbestos in a home can cause concern for everyone involved.

Having a good, reliable, certified home inspector in your network of professionals is very important. When a home inspection is conducted you want to make sure that a credible person is there doing the work. Especially if your reputation depends on it. A good home inspector that you can trust might take time to find, but it’s important for you and your clients that someone who can efficiently conduct an inspection is there and doesn’t overlook anything as important as asbestos. From there the process would begin to get more detailed and a specific asbestos sampling would need to be done.

What If Asbestos Is Found In A Home Inspection

asbestos and real estateIt could be extremely frustrating for everyone involved when you’re close to making a sale on a home and the home inspector finds something like asbestos. When found during a pre-sale home inspection, it holds back the entire pre-selling or even selling process. Often, deals are put down or aside resulting frustration for everyone.

However with the proper procedures taken and asbestos laboratory testing, it could be possible that sales could be finalized and everyone wins. In order to make sure the home does in fact have asbestos an asbestos inspector would have to come to the home and take samples of all of the areas thought to be hazardous.

During this process, the potential buyers and the seller’s of the home might be under a lot of stress. Although the realtor would miss out on the sale of the home, the buyer and seller will be looking to their realtors for advice and guidance. At this time it would be beneficial to everyone for the realtor to point their clients in the direction of the asbestos testing company as well as the laboratory doing the testing. Since the realtor doesn’t have the expertise these companies would have, it’s important for them to get the information they need to make decisions going forwards.

For a realtor, it’s a good idea to have a good relationship with these third party companies. Someone you know is certified to inspect the area and know that they will take proper precautions when examining the home, as well as inform the buyer and seller of the situation.

A good professional relationship with the lab will pay off for the realtor. You want to be able to trust the lab and understand the process that they go through. Having confidence in your team of professionals will allow you and your clients feel confident during this stressful time.

How We Handle Asbestos In The Home

Our professional conducts an inspection of the property.

The inspections will be conducted by a certified trained professional to find Asbestos Containing Material (ACM). The certified technician may also perform an Air Quality Test if necessary.

All samples will be analyzed at our Certified Laboratory facility under the Environmental Standard criteria. After the testing we will provide the results in an easy-to-read report.

The results will accurately point out the Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM). With all the results in hand and if ACM is then we can refer you to a remediation company if requested. After remediation the problem, the removal company will provide you with a final air clearance report to show that there are no asbestos fibers in the air. You may also choose to have us return to provide the final air clearance to avoid a conflict of interest. to ensure there is no asbestos fibers present in the air.

We understand how important the buying and selling process is, and we want to ensure an educational and stress free process during the time of inspection. We value what we do and hope it helps our clients feel comfortable and confident while using our services.

Want To Learn More?

If you still have questions about  asbestos and real estate, take a look at our FAQ page for more information. If you still can’t find the answers you’re looking for, feel free to contact us online or give us a call at (908) 206-0073 and one of our friendly team members would be happy to help you.

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