All posts by IRIS Lab

6 Types of Harmful Mold That May Be Lurking in Your Home

6 Types of Harmful Mold That May Be Lurking in Your Home

6 Types of Harmful Mold That May Be Lurking in Your HomeWhile mold is found virtually everywhere you go and is not always harmful, there are certain types of mold or fungi that can pose a serious health risk to you and your family if they are present in your home. Here are a few of the most common species of toxic mold that can grow inside homes when ever there are wet surfaces or water damage, and a few tips for what to do if you think there might be harmful mold in your home.

1. Stachybotrys

Commonly referred to as “black mold,” stachybotrys is one of the most dangerous types of mold and can cause flu-like symptoms, diarrhea, headaches, memory loss and severe respiratory damage. Because their lungs are still developing, children are at an even greater risk for health problems associated with exposure to black mold.

As its nickname suggests, black mold is dark in color, although it can also be grey or dark green. It typically has a very musty or mildewy odor and is found in very damp areas of homes and other buildings.

2. Chaetomium

Chaetomium is most commonly found in homes that have water damage, as it thrives in wet, dark environments such as drywall, wallpaper, baseboards and carpets. This type of mold is similar to black mold and sometimes even shares the same environments.

Along with general signs of allergies such as red, watery eyes and trouble breathing, chaetomium spores can also cause neurological damage and certain autoimmune diseases.

3. Aspergillus

Although aspergillus spores are present in the air that many of us breathe every day, this type of mold can be dangerous to people with comprised immune systems. Exposure to aspergillus may cause allergic reactions, lung infections and a specific type of infection known as aspergillosis.

4. Penicillium

Like aspergillus, penicillium is abundant in many everyday environments, but if trapped inside your home, it can cause asthmatic symptoms, bronchitis and other respiratory problems.

5. Fusarium

Fusarium is a type of mold that is most commonly found in plant debris and soil, although it can also be found in very damp areas of your home such as underneath carpeting, inside drywall or foam insulation and in humidifier pans and HVAC systems.

Although quite rare, a serious eye infection called fusarium keratitis can result from exposure to fusarium spores.

6. Alternaria

A well-known allergy-causing mold, alternaria is present in high amounts in many climate zones during the spring and summer. Although this type of mold is usually not found in building materials, it can be present in the air inside your home and may also be found in electric cables, cardboard, canvas and other textiles.

What to Do If You Suspect Your Home Has Toxic Mold

Because toxic mold exposure can be a serious health threat, it’s important that you get professional help if you think you might have dangerous mold in your home. The first step is to have your home professionally tested for mold. This should involve a thorough inspection for any water damage or mold growth found on materials in your home, as well as an air quality test to check for airborne spores.

Next, samples will be sent to an environmental testing laboratory to determine if there are harmful species of mold in your home. If needed, you can then call in a mold remediation company to remove the toxic mold in your home and get to the bottom of any remaining sources of water damage.

Once the mold has been remediated, a clearance air test can be performed to ensure that the mold levels in your home are safe.

Don’t Let Mold Hide In Your Home!

To an untrained professional glancing at a suspect problem area might not give you the answers you need. Give us a call to discuss how we can help identify and solve the issue.

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How Does Mold Affect Allergies

How Does Mold Affect Allergies

How Does Mold Affect AllergiesAllergies are a very common problem amongst many families all over. Most often seasonal changes can bring on symptoms of coughing, sneezing, itchy eyes etc. Environmental surroundings can also play a part, but did you know that mold can also affect allergies. Household issues like mold can contribute to a person’s symptoms and they might not even know it. Read this article to learn more about how mold affects allergies.

What Is Mold?

Mold is a term used to refer to fungi that grow in the form of multicellular thread-like structures called hyphae. There are different kinds of mold and it can grow in many different areas, but one thing that’s the same is that mold requires moisture to grow.

The sources of moisture could be washing, cooking, air humidifiers, condensation or leaks from plumbing or from the outside. Poor ventilation contributes to higher humidity levels and leads to condensation, which also allows mold growth.

A person might buy an older home, doing renovations, skimping on the home inspection, and then start having symptoms of a cold or allergies. They might not realize that they have mold in their home and it’s causing them health problems.

Mold Allergy Symptoms

Mold allergy symptoms can be similar to those of other respiratory allergies:

  • Nasal congestion
  • Runny nose
  • Sneezing
  • Irritated eyes
  • Coughing
  • Wheezing
  • Itchy throat

Because mold allergies have similar symptoms as common cold or seasonal allergies it can  sometimes go unnoticed. It’s important not to ignore these signs especially if you suspect your home might have mold. If you have infants, children, and elderly living with you they  can develop symptoms sooner and be more at risk.  Some indoor mold can  produce toxins that are absorbed through your body and have serious side effects causing harm to your health.

Controlling Mold In Your Home

If you think you might have mold in your home, it’s a good idea to contact an expert. Have them assess the area and let you know if there is in fact mold. If you feel like you’re having health related symptoms to mold be sure to contact your physician and speak to them about your situation.

Controlling the mold is very important. Depending on the kind of mold you have in your home, you might need professional care to remove it. However, there are a few things you can do to help prevent it in the future.

  • Use dehumidifiers or exhaust fans — or crack open a window — to help reduce moisture and humidity in bathrooms or other rooms in your home.
  • Regularly clean garbage cans and refrigerator drip pans.
  • Regularly clear your gutters, and ensure that drainage flows away from your home’s foundation.

Be sure to contact a professional to learn more about what steps need to be followed for mold removal.

Have More Questions About Mold?

Check out our FAQ page or feel free contact us directly to learn more about how we might be able to help with your mold problem.

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Asbestos & Real Estate

asbestos-and-real-estateAs a realtor your job is very important and the kind of relationship you form with your clients will really play a part in the sales that you make. Asbestos and real estate can sometimes go hand in hand. It’s important for your clients to feel comfortable and safe with you when they are going through the process of buying a home. As a realtor, it’s a good idea to have a network of trustworthy companies you can refer out to when needed. For instance what would happen to your potential sale, your buyers and your sellers, if a house you’re trying to sell has asbestos? Check out the rest of this article to learn why it’s important for you to be knowledgeable about asbestos and real estate and how we can help!

How Home Inspections Effect A Realtor

As the realtor you play a very significant role in the home buying process. Most people whether they are the buyer or the seller will look to their real estate agent for advice. You are the person who will help them make important decisions and guide them through a process they probably aren’t familiar with. When buying and selling a home, having knowledge in many areas throughout the process can only help your reputation as a realtor. It’s important that you can refer your clients to other professionals that may be involved in the process.

A home inspection is a crucial part of buying a home. It’s when the true condition of the home is documented for the buyer and seller to review. There’s always going to be something the inspector finds, but sometimes it’s not always something little or fixable. Finding asbestos in a home can cause concern for everyone involved.

Having a good, reliable, certified home inspector in your network of professionals is very important. When a home inspection is conducted you want to make sure that a credible person is there doing the work. Especially if your reputation depends on it. A good home inspector that you can trust might take time to find, but it’s important for you and your clients that someone who can efficiently conduct an inspection is there and doesn’t overlook anything as important as asbestos. From there the process would begin to get more detailed and a specific asbestos sampling would need to be done.

What If Asbestos Is Found In A Home Inspection

asbestos and real estateIt could be extremely frustrating for everyone involved when you’re close to making a sale on a home and the home inspector finds something like asbestos. When found during a pre-sale home inspection, it holds back the entire pre-selling or even selling process. Often, deals are put down or aside resulting frustration for everyone.

However with the proper procedures taken and asbestos laboratory testing, it could be possible that sales could be finalized and everyone wins. In order to make sure the home does in fact have asbestos an asbestos inspector would have to come to the home and take samples of all of the areas thought to be hazardous.

During this process, the potential buyers and the seller’s of the home might be under a lot of stress. Although the realtor would miss out on the sale of the home, the buyer and seller will be looking to their realtors for advice and guidance. At this time it would be beneficial to everyone for the realtor to point their clients in the direction of the asbestos testing company as well as the laboratory doing the testing. Since the realtor doesn’t have the expertise these companies would have, it’s important for them to get the information they need to make decisions going forwards.

For a realtor, it’s a good idea to have a good relationship with these third party companies. Someone you know is certified to inspect the area and know that they will take proper precautions when examining the home, as well as inform the buyer and seller of the situation.

A good professional relationship with the lab will pay off for the realtor. You want to be able to trust the lab and understand the process that they go through. Having confidence in your team of professionals will allow you and your clients feel confident during this stressful time.

How We Handle Asbestos In The Home

Our professional conducts an inspection of the property.

The inspections will be conducted by a certified trained professional to find Asbestos Containing Material (ACM). The certified technician may also perform an Air Quality Test if necessary.

All samples will be analyzed at our Certified Laboratory facility under the Environmental Standard criteria. After the testing we will provide the results in an easy-to-read report.

The results will accurately point out the Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM). With all the results in hand and if ACM is then we can refer you to a remediation company if requested. After remediation the problem, the removal company will provide you with a final air clearance report to show that there are no asbestos fibers in the air. You may also choose to have us return to provide the final air clearance to avoid a conflict of interest. to ensure there is no asbestos fibers present in the air.

We understand how important the buying and selling process is, and we want to ensure an educational and stress free process during the time of inspection. We value what we do and hope it helps our clients feel comfortable and confident while using our services.

Want To Learn More?

If you still have questions about  asbestos and real estate, take a look at our FAQ page for more information. If you still can’t find the answers you’re looking for, feel free to contact us online or give us a call at (908) 206-0073 and one of our friendly team members would be happy to help you.

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Asbestos Testing Prior to Commercial Demolition

Asbestos Testing Prior to Commercial DemolitionWhether you are a commercial building owner or a contractor who will be demolishing a building or performing an internal demo, you’ll need to first safely remove any asbestos containing materials (ACMs) prior to beginning the project.

This can be a frustrating process, however, as there are a number of state and federal regulations that need to be adhered to when removing ACMs and testing for clean air to ensure the safety of you and your workers before any demolition can start. Here are some of the considerations to keep in mind before taking on a demolition project, as well as some tips for working with an asbestos testing lab.

EPA Regulations

Under the Clean Air Act, all commercial demolition and renovation projects need to follow a specific set of asbestos safety guidelines. First, the owner of the building will need to notify their state agency prior to starting any demolition or renovation so that a thorough third-party inspection can take place. The inspector will then check for any asbestos containing materials that may be present in the building, which will require professional asbestos removal before the demo project can move forward.

It’s important to note that there are also a set of regulations for removing ACMs from a commercial building, so building owners will need to bring in an asbestos removal company in order to comply with these regulations. Additionally, because asbestos particles are too small to be seen with the naked eye, working with a professional asbestos testing company is the only way to know for sure if all ACMs have been properly removed.

Keeping Your Workers Safe

All asbestos removal contractors and their employees demoing or renovating schools or public and commercial buildings need to be accredited and trained in proper asbestos handling and removal under programs that follow the standards set by the EPA’s Model Accreditation Plan (MAP). On top of this requirement, there may be additional state or local regulations that you’ll need to make sure you meet before, during and after asbestos abatement.

In addition to following local, state and federal asbestos removal regulations, there are steps you can take to make sure your workers are safe while handing ACMs. One of the most important aspects of asbestos abatement worker safety is to provide the right protective clothing and equipment and ensure that all workers know and understand how to properly utilize them. These items may include:

  • Approved safety gear, such as coveralls, gloves, masks and respirators
  • HEPA certified vacuums and other asbestos removal equipment
  • Posters or signs notifying workers of asbestos containing materials
  • Proper OSHA training

Working with an Asbestos Testing Lab

Once asbestos removal companies have taken the necessary precautions and properly removed all known ACMs from the site, the next step is to work with an asbestos testing lab to perform post-remediation testing. This final test will determine whether or not all traces of asbestos fibers have been removed so that demolition or renovations can safely begin. In the event that asbestos is still detected in the air based on the lab sample results, your asbestos testing company can work with you until lab samples show that all asbestos fibers are gone.

What Else Do You Need To Know About Asbestos Testing?

If you still have questions about how asbestos testing works and what the process entails, take a look at our FAQ page for more information. If you still can’t find the answers you’re looking for, feel free to contact us online or give us a call at (908) 206-0073 and one of our friendly team members would be happy to help you.

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Home Inspections: Why Quality Is Key!

home-inspections-why-quality-is-keyYou’ve just found your dream house and you’re anxious to get the ball rolling so you can move in and live happily ever after. It’s easy to get caught up in the excitement of buying a new home, it’s easily one of the biggest investment a person might make in their lifetime. Home inspections are an important step in the home buying process. Read this article to learn about home inspections: why quality is key. 

It’s important that you take the proper precautions to make sure the house you’re buying is a safe place to call home. From the untrained professional there are details that might go unnoticed. A thorough home inspection will help bring the true condition of the home to light and give the buyer confidence that he’s making the right decision.

Why Are Home Inspections Important?

Even though you might think you’ve found your dream home, it’s your inspector’s job to make sure that your home is in a good, safe condition and doesn’t need any major repairs. A certified home inspector will analyze the property and all its major functions such as; major mechanical systems such as furnace and air conditioning systems, plumbing and electrical components, as well as an overall analysis of the roof.

A home inspector will also determine whether the home has any potential hazardous health risks like mold, lead paint or asbestos. If your home does have one of these flaws, don’t freak out just yet. A professional and qualified home inspector should also be able to suggest other professionals who can help remove and  remedy the problem.

Once the home inspection is complete  the inspector should give you a detailed report, from there it is the buyer’s responsibility to follow up with any questions or concerns. Moving forward you can discuss the results with your realtor to decide if this purchase is right for you. You can also review the results with the sellers and ask them to repair some of the things on your priority list. Having the home inspection will help you plan what kind of costs you’re willing to put into the home after the closing.

What If My Home Inspector Finds Asbestos?

If your home inspector suspects there may be asbestos or asbestos containing materials than it’s a good idea to contact a professional who is certified to treat the material. There is a step by step process to remedy the issue.

Inspection Of The Property

You just had a home inspection, so why does the property need to be inspected again? If the home is suspected to have asbestos than one of our certified and trained professional to come out and inspect all of the problem areas and areas that are thought to have asbestos and samples of those materials will be collected.

Samples – Sent To The Lab

Samples are sent to our Certified Laboratory facility under the Environmental Standard criteria. Each piece of material will be analyzed and tested for further findings.

Lab Analysis and Solutions

Once the lab has completed the testing an easy to read report will be generated and available to go over. If the tests show (ACM Asbestos Containing Material) than it is time to start looking for a remediation service company.

Post Remediation

After the asbestos has been removed and the home is thought to be safe of any hazardous materials,  a third party company must perform what is commonly called Clearance Air Test to ensure there is no asbestos fibers present in the air.

Why Should You Choose A Professional?

The potential buyer has the choice of who does the home inspection. It’s important that you do the research a choose someone who is qualified to do a thorough inspection. This sometimes goes deeper than just a look at some of the homes major mechanical systems. There are some other tests that can be done that may be helpful to you based on the condition of your home.

Older homes may have some hidden issues that are naked to the eye. Your home inspector should be able to tell you by the age of the home and overall condition of some of those tests are necessary for further investigation.

If there is an issue of asbestos it’s best to hire someone who is certified and trained to handle the situation. Dealing with asbestos can be a potential health risk to you and your family. If it’s not dealt with properly it could lead to bigger problems.

Choosing a home inspector is really important. Choosing a certified and qualified inspector could be crucial to the outcome of your home inspection. It’s a good idea to have some questions prepared so you can see how each person differs.

Questions To Ask A Home Inspector:

  • Are you licensed?
  • How long have you been in business?
  • Do you have a limitation of liability clause in your contract?
  • What experience do you have that is related to home inspections?
  • If you miss something in the home inspection, what happens?
  • Are your inspectors infrared (IR) certified?
  • How do you inspect tall roofs above two stories?
  • How is my report delivered to me?
  • How long does it take to get a report?

A good quality home inspector will play a big part in your home inspection. When purchasing  a home, make sure you educate about the process so you can make the best possible decisions.

What Else Do You Need To Know About Home Inspections?

If you still have questions about home inspections and why it’s important to contact a professional, take a look at our FAQ page for more information. If you still can’t find the answers you’re looking for, feel free to contact us online or give us a call at (908) 206-0073 and one of our friendly team members would be happy to help you.

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Asbestos & Home Renovations: What You Need to Know

asbestos-home-renovations-what-you-need-to-knowStarting any renovation project on your home can be an exciting adventure. However, it could also pose a serious threat to your health if you’re unsure of whether or not there may be asbestos in your home.

Because the primary health risks occur when tiny asbestos fibers are released into the air, a DIY home renovation project can quickly turn into a dangerous situation if you’re not careful. Fortunately, you don’t have to tackle this problem on your own. Here is some important information about asbestos and home renovations and what you can do if you need help detecting and testing for asbestos materials.

Understanding the Risk of Asbestos in the Home

As the saying goes, it’s better to be safe than sorry, and that is certainly true when dealing with materials that could potentially contain asbestos, which can be very hazardous to your health. So before you dig into a home renovation project, you’ll want to assess the likelihood that your house contains asbestos materials so that you can take the necessary precautions.

Some telltale signs that may indicate the presence of asbestos in your home include:

  • The structure was built before 1980
  • Your home contains old floor tiles, laminate, cement sheet, pipe cement or original roof shingles
  • Your older home has never been professionally renovated before

While looking for these signs and types of materials is a good place to start, the only way to know for sure if your home contains asbestos is to have a professional perform an asbestos test on any suspected areas of your home. Unfortunately, this isn’t something that you can do on your own, because asbestos is impossible to detect with the naked eye and you could create a larger risk while searching for asbestos-containing materials than just leaving them alone and calling in a professional.

Treat All Materials Like They Contain Asbestos

If you’ve already started your renovation project and have come across materials that you think could contain asbestos, the best approach is to treat all suspected materials as though they have already tested positive for asbestos. This means that you should discontinue all demolition efforts and leave those materials as undisturbed as possible. This will help to reduce the risk that harmful asbestos particles could be released into the air.

Find an Asbestos Testing Lab

The next step is to find an asbestos testing lab so that you can know for sure if you need to hire a team of professionals to remove it before safely continuing with your renovation project.

In order to test for asbestos, a certified and trained professional will inspect your home for asbestos-containing materials (ACMs), as well as perform an air quality test. Then, the samples that were collected from your home will be sent off to a laboratory for testing. You will then be notified of the results of these tests.

How to Get Rid of Asbestos

At this point, many homeowners often wonder if taking on asbestos removal themselves is an option. Since breathing in the asbestos particles that will be released during the removal process is what makes this substance so dangerous, you should always rely on a reputable asbestos remediation company to do this for you.

Once the ACMs have been removed from your house, an asbestos testing company will need to return to perform what’s called a clearance air test to make sure that there are no longer asbestos particles inside your home. After this final test comes back showing no signs of asbestos, you’ll have the green light to move full speed ahead on your renovations!

Want to learn more about how Iris Labs can help you with your construction or renovation project? CONTACT US TODAY 

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5 health risks caused by asbestos

5 Health Risks Caused By Asbestos

5 health risks caused by asbestosAsbestos is a building material that was used pretty widely across the U.S. prior to the 1980s. It was then that asbestos was thought of as a solution to various industries to help build homes. However, there are health risks caused by asbestos. 

Asbestos is a group of naturally-occurring fibrous minerals. It’s strong and heat resistant. This made is popular in building materials such as including building and pipe insulation, and friction products.

It wasn’t until after years of use that it was deemed seriously dangerous, even deadly to those exposed to it. Asbestos is a serious health risk and can cause harm. If you think you might have been exposed to asbestos or live in a home where you suspect asbestos, read this article to learn 5 health risks caused by asbestos.

Health Risks Caused By Asbestos

Laryngeal Cancer

Laryngeal cancer is cancer of the larynx, also known as the voice box. Researchers have suspected that people who inhaled asbestos got it’s fibers lodged into the voice making its way to the lungs. The fibers cause irritation which eventually lead to cancer.

Asbestosis

Asbestosis is a lung disease that is said to be caused by scarring of the lung tissue. Exposure the asbestos can cause a person to breath in the dangerous fibers. The fibers will attach themselves to the lung walls and over time cause scarring. Over time the lungs will become irritated and the tissue becomes thick. This can be painful causing chest pains and shortness of breath.

Clubbed Fingers

People with asbestosis often develop clubbed fingers. This is actually an early sign of the disease where the tips of the fingers are swollen and look like a square shape. This happens when there is a dangerously low blood levels of oxygen.

Pleural Plaques

Pleural plaques are caused by deposits of fiberglass and rock left from the asbestos. The pleura contains two layers: An inner layer that lines the lungs, and an outer layer that lines the ribs. The presence of asbestos fibers can cause these layers to inflame and rub against each other, a condition called pleuritis. Unfortunately there is no cure for this disease and serious medication is required for treatment.

Mesothelioma

Mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer, it affects the inner linings of organ walls in the chest and the stomach. Typically this is caused to exposure to asbestos is the work place, but you may not notice symptoms until years later, sometimes as late as 30 years past the time of exposure.  To date there is no cure for this disease.

Avoiding Asbestos Exposure

Since asbestos is banned from use, newer homes may not be in danger of containing any remnant of the substance. However, it is important to keep away from asbestos if you suspect it in your home or workplace. There are safety procedures set in place to evaluate the area in question and do proper asbestos testing. From there it’s important to understand the information on asbestos give from the testing lab. Once this is given talk to a professional about whether the asbestos needs to be removed and if it is a threat to your health.

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5 Asbestos Facts You Didn’t Know

5 Asbestos Facts You Didn’t KnowBecause of its fire- and water-resistant properties, asbestos has long been used as a versatile building material. It was commonly used in homes, schools, and other structures until fairly recently when its serious health hazards came to light. Now, home inspectors check for asbestos before a sale is able to go through.

If you’re concerned that your home might contain this material, which could be putting you and your family at risk, here is some information  that could help.

1. Asbestos Was a Popular Building Material Until the 1980s

The dangers include an increased risk for lung cancer and other respiratory illnesses such as asbestosis, were largely unknown to the public until the 1980s. As a result, homes built before this period have a higher likelihood of contamination.

For this reason, it’s a good idea to have your home inspected, especially if you’re planning on remodeling any part of your home, which could release dangerous asbestos fibers into the air.

2. Not All Asbestos-Containing Products Are Banned in the U.S.

Despite the fact that the health hazards of asbestos are now widely recognized, not all materials that contain it have been banned in the United States. This means that even new construction could potentially contain asbestos.

According to the EPA, just some of the asbestos-containing materials that are currently not banned in the U.S. include:

  • Cement sheet
  • Roofing felt and roof coatings
  • Vinyl floor tile
  • Cement shingle and pipe
  • Millboard

3. Asbestos Poses a Health Risk When Inhaled or Ingested

Asbestos becomes dangerous when its dust particles are released into the air, where they can be easily inhaled or ingested. Because of this, many people are unaware that they have been exposed to it at all.

Before you begin a home renovation or DIY remodeling project, get your home assessed  to make sure you’re not unknowing putting yourself and your family at risk.

Keep in mind, too, that even drilling, sanding, or pressure-washing materials that contain asbestos could potentially release the harmful fibers into the air, so it’s important to know for sure whether or not your home contains this material before moving forward with a project.

4. Asbestos Can Be Difficult to Detect

Another reason it can be such a challenging problem for homeowners is that it is often difficult or even impossible to detect by simply visually inspecting your home. This is because the fibers that cause these health risks are generally too small to see with the naked eye.

Additionally, because so many different building materials could possibly contain asbestos, there’s no surefire way to tell whether or not you might be at risk by simply performing a self-evaluation of the building. If you’re unsure about the presence of asbestos in any part of your home, it’s better to play it safe and have samples professionally tested.

5. Only a Licensed Professional Should Assess and Remove Asbestos

If lab tests come back showing that your home does contain asbestos, the next step is to take steps to safely remediate it. Attempting to remove asbestos from your home yourself, however, can be much more dangerous than just leaving it alone. If you have an asbestos problem, the best way to get rid of it is to rely on trained and certified professionals who can safely and effectively remove it.

Then, once you’ve called in the professionals, it’s a good idea to have the air quality of your home retested to make sure that all traces of asbestos are gone to give you the peace of mind that you and your family are safe.

Want To Know More Facts?

If you still have questions about asbestos take a look at our FAQ page for more information. If you still can’t find the answers you’re looking for, feel free to contact us online or give us a call at (908) 206-0073 and one of our friendly team members would be happy to help you.

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how to spot asbestos

How To Tell If Your House Has Asbestos

How To Tell If Your House Has AsbestosThe word asbestos can be scary for many people. If you’re in the market to buy a home or maybe doing some remodeling, you might want learn more information on what asbestos is, how you can spot it, and most importantly how to treat it. Check out the rest of this article to learn more on how you can tell if your house has asbestos.

How To Tell If Your House Has Asbestos

Generally asbestos is not identifiable by the naked eye. It’s a mixture of natural fibrous minerals that’s odorless and colorless. However, there are signs that your home could be at risk for asbestos. Homes built prior to 1980 are at a larger risk of having asbestos contaminated products. This was before there was a ban on the material.

Some construction materials used that could potentially be hazardous due to asbestos contamination include:

  • Old floor tiles or laminate
  • Roof shingles
  • Pipe cement
  • Insulation
  • Heat and water piping

The only way to be sure if your home is contains asbestos is to have professional testing done on suspected areas in your home.

Asbestos Removal: Is It A DIY Project?

When going through any kind of real estate transaction most people have a budget. If you’re a handy person it’s a smart idea to do some home projects yourself, especially if you’re trying to cut back on costs. However, asbestos removal is very different then painting your walls, or putting in new lighting fixtures.

When asbestos is disturbed and the fibers get into the air, breathing them in can be extremely hazardous to your health. If you suspect your home has asbestos, it’s best to seek professional help and have the area properly tested before doing any attempted removal, cleaning, or construction yourself.

What To Do If Your House Has Asbestos

If your home does test for asbestos it’s best to have a certified company come in and do the necessary asbestos removal. The process of removal will be determined by what kind of asbestos and where in the home it’s located. In some cases, if the materials containing asbestos are in good condition and fibers can not be released it’s best to leave them alone and not disrupt them, but the areas should be monitored for any future deterioration. After the removal is completed, air quality testing should be done to ensure that the asbestos was properly treated and the homeowners are no longer at risk.

Calling A Professional

Whether your home needs a temporary solution or a complete asbestos removal, it’s important that you call a professional to come to your home and properly do the testing and give the pending results. Most home repair companies are not certified to do asbestos removal. Do you research or ask for a referral to a professional who will help keep you and your home safe.

Still Have Questions About Asbestos?

If you still have questions about asbestos testing , take a look at our FAQ page for more information. If you still can’t find the answers you’re looking for, feel free to contact us online or give us a call at (908) 206-0073 and one of our friendly team members would be happy to help you.

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